Let’s Write A Novel #7 How To Deal With A Writing Setback

I’m writing a new novel and blogging through the process so that you can learn along with me.

For those who want to dive right in, if you’re on the email list, you can head over to the google folder and check out the latest updates to the draft.

If you missed the most recent blog post about dealing with unsupportive loved ones, you can check it out here.

 Earlier posts in the series are all gathered here.

There is no weekly update this week because I’ve started hitting a snag in the storyline, and I’m kind of bored with how it’s going. Even though I’m not posting these updates in chronological order, I do have a rough chronology in my head of how it plays out, and I feel like the characters are making emotional growth leaps without my input or without the input of the plot to help them along. That’s great for them, but it makes the story feel inauthentic to me, so I’ve taken a step back to figure out what they really need to learn and to do next.

While I’m doing that, I thought it would make a post about coping with setbacks, because I’m pretty much an expert on that subject.

Continue reading

Feminist Friday 2018 #1: Feminism Saved My Life

I was born 2 1/2 months premature. I have cerebral palsy. I use a wheelchair because I have no real use of my lower body, low trunk strength, and limited use of my upper body. I blog mostly by using a voice to text program called Dragon Naturally Speaking.

Dragon makes everything super interesting. Did you know that it can spell words like “Chewbacca” and “Obi-Wan Kenobi” but it can’t remember to capitalize my name unless I tell it to do so with a special command? (My name is a noun, and it always thinks I’m talking about roses when I say my name.)

My disability also affects my vision, visual perception, the clarity of my speech, and my bladder control.

The speech issue is another reason Dragon makes everything more interesting, now that I think about it.

Anyway.

Continue reading

Let’s Write A Novel #6: Dealing With Unsupportive Loved Ones

I’m writing a new novel and blogging through the process so that you can learn along with me.

 

Due to some unforseen circumstances, I’ve decided to limit access to the planning materials in the Google Folder after this week.  You can still head over there to check out the updates today, but in the future, if you want access to my planning and drafting materials, you’ll need to sign up for my email list.

If you missed the last post about using cheat sheets to quickly access and organize your notes, you can check it out here.

 

 Earlier posts in the series are all gathered here.

 

This week I want to talk about coping with unsupportive loved ones. I see questions about this come up a lot in writer’s groups, especially from new writers who are struggling to balance commitment to their loved ones with the desire to write.

Continue reading

Everything I’ve Learned Has Been The Hard Way

This is a bit of a personal post, but I wanted to share it because I’ve seen a lot of women lately discounting their accomplishments because:

(A) They don’t have a traditional education or career
(B) They’ve made mistakes in their past

Or something else that is holding them back because they’re embarrassed.

Look.  Here’s the deal.

Continue reading

10 Ways to Honor A Loved One Privately

Image256

Grief and loss are intensely personal experiences, but most of our rituals for honoring or remembering a loved one who has died are public and social. This can be a great way to connect with others and gain support during a time of mourning, but you may also want a more private, reflective way to express your sadness, loss, or other emotions and to remember the person you are grieving.

When my grandpa died this February, I knew that I was not going to be able to attend his funeral service. I still wanted to honor him and find a way to process my feelings about him. Here is a list of 10 ideas I have for privately honoring a departed loved one.

Continue reading