Premade Cover

This is a premade ebook cover. Print version is available for additional cost.

My premade covers aren’t templates.  Once you make this purchase, the design and all variants are retired.  They’ll stay on my site, but won’t be sold to anyone else.  I will also publish your finished covers (free advertising for your books.)

 

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Premade Cover: Scifi Flame

This is a premade ebook cover. Print version is available for additional cost.

My premade covers aren’t templates. Once you make this purchase, the design and all variants are retired. They’ll stay on my site, but won’t be sold to anyone else. I will also publish your finished covers (free advertising for your books.)

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Beyond Professor X and Oracle: Moving Disability Awareness Forward

This is a repost from my old blog.

I’ve been involved in a lot of conversations discussions about portrayals of people who use wheelchairs in prominent television and movie roles. There are only four that I can think of.

Ironside debuted in 1967 and ran until 1975. A recent attempt to reboot the series was canceled after only eight episodes. I think Ironside was significant enough to warrant its own post, since it was the first show to have a character with a disability in the title role.  I’ll be discussing Logan Cale later on when I talk about romance and disability in the media.  This post will look at Professor Xavier and Oracle

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The Sorceress Didn’t Have to Lie to Teela and Here’s Why

Sorceress of Castle Grayskull

Sorceress of Castle Grayskull (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

This post is a re-working of several posts I made in early 2014 about the Sorceress and Teela.

 

My biggest plotting pet peeve is when characters keep secrets from one another that serve no useful purpose.  There’s nothing wrong with the character having a secret or secrets. It drives me crazy when characters keep secrets that do more harm than good and never seem to grasp the idea that they are causing their own problems when they lie to their loved ones.  There are PLENTY of good, interesting stories that can be told without this particular cheap plot device.

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Technology and Civilization

Spent the last half hour trying to create a new Yahoo account to share public domain photos on Flickr.
 
Yahoo now requires a cell phone and “doesn’t support” landline phones. Other email providers I checked are heading the same way for new accounts.
 
I am regularly asked to text people photographs. No one says “Do you have a phone? Can your phone do this…?” anymore.
 
Cell phones are becoming a ubiquitous part of society, like “regular” phones have been for generations.
 
A prepaid cell can cost as little as $9.99
 
And yet, I consistently hear people grumbling about “the poor” having access to cell phone technology on the assumption that cell phones still cost hundreds of dollars.
 
“If you can afford a cell phone, you aren’t poor/don’t need help.”
 
Slowly but surely, we are creating a social order in which access to technology means access to civilization.
 
Think I’m exaggerating? Catastrophizing?
 
Science fiction has been predicting the future for a long time now…

Love Stories: Randor and Marlena

I want to reshare these amazing tributes to the two people whose love story has held my imagination for close to thirty years.  I felt like sharing them today would be appropriate.  The vidder is an amazing artist who uses the fandom nick Teelana78.

My Biggest Pop-Culture Plottin Pet Peeve

 

[This is a slightly altered version of one of my earliest blog posts, cleaned up as a standalone piece.

 

My biggest plotting pet peeve can be summed up  in the following phrase:

“I can’t tell you —for your own protection!”

It’s often used in connection with characters who have secret identities or live double lives. So, it’s common when dealing with superheroes, but I’ve also seen it in urban fantasy, thrillers, mystery novels, and it pops up every now and again in high fantasy. You have a hero who is supposed to be trustworthy keeping a huge secret from his or her loved ones, coworkers, etc. The secret is usually justified by saying something to the effect that if any of these people knew the secret, it would put them in greater danger. The problem is, these people are usually in a lot of danger anyway, and keeping them in the dark doesn’t serve any useful purpose. It’s a lazy, cheap, overused way of creating plot tension, and it becomes an excuse to keep characters from growing and changing in their relationships with one another.

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